by Janis on 21st March 2022 / 0 comments

Out with the old and in with the new

Nope, I wasn’t going to put it off any longer, and bizarrely this potting shed doesn’t clean and tidy itself.

I wanted to start sowing my seeds for the coming season. My trusty potting shed is fantastic for this, especially when organised. I know where everything is to hand, and I know exactly where it is.

Although what I additionally need to add is that I’m struggling to see out the potting shed windows, not just because they need a good buff but also because some unruly ivy has encroached on my space.

A satisfying days’ work

Let’s not mention the pots
So, there was nothing for it, a beautiful spring day had arrived in mid-March, and it was time for a de-clutter. To be perfectly honest, it’s not just a clear out; I also gain an understanding of which planting products I have an excess of and which I need to buy.
The worktop inside the potting shed before the spring clean cluttered, and in need of a good tidy
The Potting Shed before a spring clean

It is actually quite therapeutic; slowly but surely, I move the larger items outside, revealing more and more pots along the way. Surely one person does not need so many pots; I appear to have a pot for every occasion and every size of plant.

Not only do the pots appear to have multiplied over time, but I also think the local spiders have well and truly moved in and got their knees and elbows out.

Don’t make the same mistake as me

You’ll save yourself some money

I keep a little wooden tray on my worksurface full of loose bits and bobs. It’s always fun rummaging through the dibbers, old marker pens that etched their last words many moons ago, a random packet of seeds which I only sowed 20 or 30 of the 4,000 that were included. And also, old handwritten seed tags, which I obviously thought could be recycled.

While clearing out my potting shed, I had come to the conclusion that I certainly didn’t need any more chicken manure pellets or blood, fish and bone fertilisers. If only I had cleared out the potting shed last week, I wouldn’t have bought more. Oh well, I’m sure it will get used.

Chicken manure pellets and blood, fish and bone, are great non-chemical fertilisers for your garden; your plants, flowers and vegetables will love them.

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Is it an obsession or a fascination?

Either way, I’m hooked
Through de-cluttering, I understood the number of seed trays I had, and now I only need to buy some clear plastic lids to propagate my seeds; at least, that has saved some money. I don’t have a greenhouse in my garden, and my cold frame is a little too chilly at the moment, so our conservatory is to become an intermediary stop until the weather warms up.
The inside of the potting shed after a spring clean and you can now see the worktop.
The Potting Shed after a spring clean

Through de-cluttering, I understood the number of seed trays I had, and now I only need to buy some clear plastic lids to propagate my seeds; at least, that has saved some money.

I don’t have a greenhouse in my garden, and my cold frame is a little too chilly at the moment, so our conservatory is to become an intermediary stop until the weather warms up.

I've just invested in this handy digital thermometer for conservatories and greenhouses. It'll help me understand when I can move the seedlings to the cold frame, as it displays the current temperature also the maximum and minimum reached.

The little green plastic digital thermometer displays the high and low, as well as current, temperature in our cold frame
The digital garden thermometer in our cold frame
It also appears that I was once obsessed with buying garden tools as I have a trowel for every eventuality. Talking of obsession, I think I need to get my seed addiction under control, too; I obviously thought that if I hid them in a seed tin, then Gary wouldn’t notice. He did spot the bursting tins; however, that didn’t stop me from picking up a few more at the garden centre.

Organisation is key

It’s worth it in the end

It felt so much better after re-organising my shed; obviously, it’s never going to be spotless; it’s a potting shed, after all.

Gary put up some tool hanger hooks and pegs for me around the wooden beams of the shed, and now I can hang up my garden tools, sieves, and scoops. I now have more room on my worktop to get fully underway with my seed sowing.

A seed tray on the worktop of the now tidy potting shed

Sowing Seeds in the potting shed

One last job that Gary helped me with was clearing away the boisterous ivy from the outside of the shed, which was blocking the sunshine from peeking through. Once we’d cleaned the windows, my potting shed felt like it had received a new lease of life.

It was time to grab my compost and trays, tear open the tiny seed packets and start sowing.

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